Category Archives: Children’s Non-Fiction

For the Right to Learn Malala Yousafzai’s Story

Title: For the Right to Learn;
Malala Yousafzai’s Story
Author:Rebecca Langston-George
Genre: Children’s Nonfiction, autobiography
Publisher: Capstone Young Readers
Publishing date: 1st September, 2015
ISBN: 9781623704261
Purchase Link:

Synopsis: A fascinating story of peace, bravery, and non-violent protest*Malala Yousafzai won the Nobel Peace Prize*An inspiring, illustrated nonfiction picture book for young readers

My Review:

For the Right to learn, tell the story of Malala, a young girl, who refused to be silent in a world where woman are expected to remain quiet. She opposed the taliban rules, argued for education for girls, and was almost killed for her beliefs. This story is the proof that one little voice can change the world.
This tells Malala’s story from her beginning as a child in Swat Valley of Pakistan to her present day in Birmingham. Malala’s story is retold beautifully by Rebecca Langston-George, accompanied with gorgeous illustrations by Janna Bock. This book gives children the opportunity to learn and understand the struggles Malala has faced, as well as the enormous courage she proved and continue to prove by carrying out her work for equal education for all.
The story is gripping and powerful, told in a simple, easy to understand, language.

Advertisements

Luna’s Red Hat

Author: Emmi Smid
Publisher:  Jessica Kingsley Publishers
Publishing Date: 21.04.2015
Purchase linkamazon.co.uk
ISBN: 9781849056298

Synopsis: An Illustrated Storybook to Help Children Cope with Loss and Suicide

My Review:
Luna’s Red Hat takes up the important subject of suicide, a little discussed  taboo topic in our society. Following a beautifully illustrated story of one day in Luna’s life, we get to know how she lost her mother just a year ago and we see a father who is struggling with helping Luna understand what happened as well as coming to terms with his loss.

Through the story Luna behaves realistically, though her thoughts might not be as genuine as her behavior. The loss and the lack of understanding of what happened, has made her frustrated and angry. Her father pulls er through and help her understand is small, clear words what happened to her mother as well as explaining that it was not Luna or any one else’s fault.

As well as containing the small story of Luna and her little family the book ends with an informative essay by Dr. Riet Fiddelaers Jaspers. The essay outlines how to tell a child about such a thing as suicide, and why it is important to actually let the child know what happened.

This book is designed to help children deal with loss and suicide, but I believe adults also could benefit from reading it.

Missing Jack

Author: Rebecca Elliott
Lion Hudson Plc
Published: 20.02.2015

amazon.co.uk || Waterstones.com

Missing Jack is a nice little book which can help children come to terms with loss. It is a short story about the best cat in the world, but sadly he grew old and died. Though the book the narrator explains why Jack was the best cat in the world, and that he misses Jack. And that is okay. Children need to learn about loss in a safe manner, and they need to learn about death in order to grief.
In the end the narrator comes to terms with the fact that it is okay to get a new cat, but the new cat will not make Jack less special.

I enjoyed reading this book, and even though I’m an adult I did feel a bit sad while reading the part where Jack died.

Jack Staples and the Ring of Time

Author: Mark Batterson 
& Joel N. Clark
David C Cook
Published: 01.09.2014

amazon.co.uk || Waterstones.com

To begin with “Jack Staples and the Ring of Time” was kind of hard to get into. The time jumping was confusing and not very easy to follow during the first few chapters. The pace started off a bit slow but picked up through the book and after two-thirds of it I was hooked. The world is built well, and everything is explained in due time.

There is an ancient battle going on between good and evil, and we are just starting to see it. All humans and animals are born with scales on their eyes which prevents them from seeing the evil creatures for what they are, but the scales are starting to come off, so people turn into the “awakened.”
Jack Staples is born without scales on his eyes and he has the ability to walk through time., a power he has to come to terms with and learn to control. Just because you can walk through time, it does not mean that you can play god, somethings cannot be change no matter how hard you try.

It is easy to see “The Author” and “The Assassin” as euphemism for “God” and “the Devil”, as they portray their characteristics through their representation of ancient good and evil. The book portray a Christian moral, but in a concealed way and without making the reader feel preached to..

I did not like the character of Mrs. Dumphry,as most of her dialogue felt contrived and her “riddles” were more of less only consisting on well-chewed clichés. And she seemed more like a “plot-device” rather than a necessary character.

However, I look forward to read more of this series. and see where Jack Staples end up.

Pretend Friends (book review)

pretend friendsA story about schizophrenia and 
other illnesses that can cause 
hallucinations 
Author: Alice Hoyle
Jessica Kingsley Publishers
Published: 21.02.2015
Amazon.co.uk || Waterstones.com

“Pretend Friends” paints a good picture of psychosis, what it is and how it works. It is written in simple words and uses “pretend friends” as a simile, which makes it easier for a child to relate to and understand the subject.
The story is short but it still gives a lot of information, both for the adult and the child. The child’s pretend friends and the “pretend friends” that portray adults are drawn differently as to better distinguish between the two (without making the latter one look scary).

Also the book features and introduction for adults as well as a F&Q at the end with questions that children might ask after reading the book. The F&Q is very informative as well as being formulated in a way that a child also can understand (with some help from an adult).

I did really enjoy this book and I would also like to see more of these kind of stories to explain other mental illnesses. As the lack of understanding of mental illnesses is evident in out society, I think we could hugely benefit from more books like this one.

All royalties earned by this book goes to support rething.org and their work with mental illnesses!